Funemployment, or a holiday?

It’s a week now since I’ve finished Community Service.

I decided to take this week to organise my admin and recover from a long year. A holiday, if you will. Only, this time my holiday is unpaid leave. Oh, I do miss formal employment.

21742767ba40de8c1e36e7ff7afc5a03 Continue reading “Funemployment, or a holiday?”

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The Threat of Fun-employment

In final year, we thought that getting an internship post at our desired hospital was the hardest – and most coveted – thing.

Two years later, we all tried to find a community service posting that would give us a foot into the door to our future specialties.

But we didn’t know that those were the easy parts. Then, we still pretty much had guaranteed employment (most of us, at least).

Then came the end of Community Service, and reality hit us in the face: we were on our own.

* * *

That’s where I am now. The government no longer “owes” me a job, and unless I find one, I’ll be unemployed come January 2018. People used to say, “There’s no such thing as an unemployed doctor.” These days, there are plenty of them, because freezing posts is a done thing. Continue reading “The Threat of Fun-employment”

Doctors and Piercings: Part 3

It’s been nearly five years since I decided to get a nose piercing. I mused about the decision on the blog both before and after the fact.

Since becoming a “real” doctor, I’ve never had a patient refer to my piercing. As mentioned before, it really isn’t that conspicuous. I’ve also noticed more and more doctors who have nose piercings, so it probably isn’t so strange in South African healthcare workers as it was in 2011.

This year, after working with a certain doctor for three months, he finally noticed the piercing. His response was, “Well that’s atypical,” then he laughed and we moved on with our ward round.

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You can see it, but just barely.

I removed my nose jewellery recently, and in many ways that decision was as difficult as getting it in the first place. Continue reading “Doctors and Piercings: Part 3”

If You Plan To Spend Mandela Day At A Hospital…

Although I believe that community service should be a habit rather than an annual event, I am a big fan of Mandela Day. I’m a child of the 90s, after all, and my first hero was Nelson Mandela. There’s nothing quite like a day where the whole nation reaches out to one another to build morale. (And it’s not just for South Africans!)

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Public hospitals are a popular venue for community service, which is not entirely a bad thing because many of our patients truly fit the description of being disenfranchised.

But every year, my colleagues and I find ourselves a little annoyed by many of the people who arrive to do their bit. Here are some pointers if you intend to visit a hospital this Mandela Day – or any other day. Continue reading “If You Plan To Spend Mandela Day At A Hospital…”

Ten Reasons I Love Audiobooks

I’m linking up with The Broke and The Bookish for Top Ten Tuesdays for “Ten Reasons I Love [X]”. Join up, link up, click through and see what everyone else loves, and why!

I only started listening to audiobooks two years ago. I’m pretty easy-going when it comes to books: while print will always be my first love, I’m not the type to scorn ebooks and audiobooks. Reading is reading, and I love it! That said, there are some reasons I have grown fond of audiobooks:

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Art by Philip Tseng (click)

1. It’s a bonding experience for my dad and me

Continue reading “Ten Reasons I Love Audiobooks”

The Nicest Interns: Part 2

I just recently finished a four-month Family Medicine rotation. Our after-hours duties on Family  Medicine are as casualty officers at the Accident and Emergency Departments of two different hospitals. Because A&E has high-intensity decision making, our shifts were not allowed to be longer than twelve hours (compare: 24 hour shifts in any other department).

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Continue reading “The Nicest Interns: Part 2”

The Nicest Interns: Part 1

It’s so easy to complain about my daily work. Annoying patients, a system that is falling apart a little more every day, and inconsiderate or lazy doctors and nurses  <– you see?

And then there are some of my colleagues who just really make me want to be a better person – and a better doctor.

One of our intern-colleagues is well-loved for being a bundle of fun and kindness. Whatever event our hospital’s social committee organises: he’s there, and he is their biggest promoter. He introduces people to each other, and he encourages them to get out of their shell.

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Then there was that one time he walked around casualty on Easter Weekend dressed as the Easter Bunny, handing out goodies to all the interns on-call.

How nice is that?!?!?!

When he has a calm call-duty, he walks around and helps the services that are having a rougher time of it.

Written down, it may seem like he is the biggest gunner or kiss-ass. But he is just so genuine that it does not seem to get on anybody’s nerves (not even my very flammable ones).

I’m by far not a lazy or a mean intern, but when I see people like this guy, I just think: wow. I want to be like that when I grow up.

Unrealistic YA Fiction Is Not Such A Big Problem

Young Adult fiction treads a fine line. On the one hand, it needs to be in touch with its audience. YA readers want to see protagonists who speak realistically, eat realistically, and act realistically.

On the other hand, reading offers us the opportunity to live different lives; to travel to places and settings and adventures that we may never have, and very few people want to read about a normal, boring setting. (Although I am told that Patrick Ness’ The Rest of Us Just Live Here addresses this very well, I’ve not yet read it.)

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Not the topic for this discussion, but I do want to read this book.

Continue reading “Unrealistic YA Fiction Is Not Such A Big Problem”

Two Oceans Ultra Part 2: Race Review

It’s a week since running the Two Oceans Ultra and it still feels like a life-defining moment. I’m already looking forward to next year’s marathon, although my foot is still protesting. I figured I’d offer a few concise lines about particular aspects of the race:

Signing up:

For me, the process went so smoothly. I thought the interface was user-friendly and easy; but I do know that some people had big problems with signing up. The entries do fly, so for future reference, waiting is probably not the best idea. Especially if you’d rather enter for the half-marathon – those entries fly like hot-cakes!

Marketing:

The marketing team did such a great job of hyping everyone up and keeping one up to date. The OMTOM Magazine was superb and the social media pages well-maintained. The biggest flaw was a lack of interaction on social media with people who had complaints.

12924415_10153946065180661_3973261936145693581_n Continue reading “Two Oceans Ultra Part 2: Race Review”