GP Work is Hard

One week of some GP locums and I am exhausted.

7b609ee5184afeee3a442d25e5549028I can spend 10 minutes per consultation if people have straight-forward tonsillitis or gastroenteritis.

But what about the parents who are hesitant about vaccinating? I need more than ten minutes to make an impact.

What about the woman whose pregnancy test was unexpectedly positive, and needs to discuss options? She might not have anyone else to discuss options with.

What about the myriad people with psychiatric illness? I need more than ten minutes to figure out if it’s depression, or if there is a history of hypomanic spells. Is it substance induced? Is there another general medical condition? Who can start someone on antidepressants after a ten minute consult?

And what about the worried well? The old people with children abroad, with a bag full of chronic medication, and stories of challenges as numerous as the stars.
My dad has a favourite piece of advice for new graduates. It goes something like this:

Remember that when you come into contact with a patient, you may be the only person that touches them that day. The only person that hears their voice, that looks into their eyes. Make sure your touch is a kind one.

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“Expressive hand studies using various media”, Savannah7963, Conway High School.

General Practitioners are pushed for time (and push their locums for time) because it’s the only way they can make any kind of profit, really. I understand that. But that is not the family medicine that I was taught, and I’m having trouble finding the balance.

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Tips for New Interns: First Week at Work

Last night I worked my last shift for Community Service. 1 January 2018 will mark three years since I walked into my first day of work. And on that day, more than 1,000 new interns will enter our workforce.

I remember the nerves the night before: being unable to sleep. Feeling like a fraud, like I had been allowed to graduate by accident. Worried that I would be labelled Worst Intern Ever; worried that I’d have awful colleagues. But I survived the first week, and eventually the first year, too.

And so will our new interns. I have some tips for those who need ’em.

64062aa6fd8336df8d9536c250fadde7 Continue reading “Tips for New Interns: First Week at Work”

Are We Secretly Our Own Worst Enemies?

If you’ve been reading South African news, you’ll know that at least 300 interns and community service doctors stand to be unemployed next year, due to a lack of funded posts at accredited institutions.

Perhaps you read about our inhumane working hours last year.

Perhaps you have read about the overflowing hospitals where patients pile up in the corridors.

These are not new problems, we just hear about them more because doctors and patients have phones with cameras, and social media accounts.

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Continue reading “Are We Secretly Our Own Worst Enemies?”

Can I Be A Depressed Doctor?

Ever since I wrote about how going for therapy was my biggest gift to myself*, I’ve met with a few medical students to talk about the topic of mental health. Many of them were worried about their ability to make it through med school with their illness. Many were worried about the viability of a career in medicine with depression.

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When I was a student, there was a rumour that students with mental illness would be excluded from the course. We were informed by our senior students, and they by theirs, and thus the rumour was propagated. Continue reading “Can I Be A Depressed Doctor?”

DOC-U-MENTALLY: The Film [Review]

Breaking this unintentional hiatus to tell you (read: shout from the rooftops) that I have watched Doc-u-mentally and

IT.

IS.

AMAZING!

Continue reading “DOC-U-MENTALLY: The Film [Review]”