Anatomy: my big mistake

I had a little giggle to myself while charting the notes of a patient with shoulder pain the other day. Specifically, I was thinking of this post of yore, and my belief that I could get by just knowing what anatomy looked like, and not necessarily its various descriptions and qualifiers.

Boy, was I wrong. (And young. And obstinate.)

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Image via dentalbuzz.shop

Continue reading “Anatomy: my big mistake”

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Finally had my “magical paeds moment”

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Not the same child, photo with permission.

The little girl had come in hurt and bleeding. No too bad, a small gash that was easily approximated and taped (gosh, I love steri strips).

Next: the Tet tox.

She doesn’t know about it yet. For a moment I consider not telling her at all, but she is old enough to feel betrayed. So she sits on her dad’s lap, and we tell her about the special injection that will prevent her from getting sick. We may have used some imagination and invoked superheroes, too.

I braced myself for the struggle the moment the needle pierced her skin.

Nothing. Nada. She sat chewing her candy while I taped the injection site.

You know all those cute videos of doctors giving kids their shots without them noticing? I finally got mine, and that felt kind of special. Sometimes, you need just one small success to give you a bounce in your step.

The Best GP Advice I’ve Received: Part 1

 

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(c) Simon Prades

The night before my first shift in general practice, I frantically messaged one of my doctor-heroes on Twitter (@sindivanzyl). I think I was hoping for a cheat sheet, something about hypertension and diabetes, but the one thing she emphasised was, “Please, please, always examine your patients.”

For medical students that would probably sound absurd. Duh, how can one not examine the patient? 

But I learned quickly that, in an environment where there are always more patients to see, it is sometimes easier to make a quick observation from across the desk than to do as we have been taught. Continue reading “The Best GP Advice I’ve Received: Part 1”

General Practice is not exciting, but it is fulfilling

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By Lauren Squires, with permission. Click image for her Instagram.

As I enter into my third month of General Practitioner work, I find myself reflecting. I started with private GP locums to fill the gap til I got the job I wanted. But now I’m signing a contract and I’m here to stay – for at least another five months.

One evening, my housemate asked, “So, did anything interesting happen at work today?” When I responded in the negative, we laughed about how my work had become almost mundane compared to working in hospital and coming home with fascinating stories of grotesque injuries and life-saving surgeries practically every day. Continue reading “General Practice is not exciting, but it is fulfilling”

GP Work is Hard

One week of some GP locums and I am exhausted.

7b609ee5184afeee3a442d25e5549028I can spend 10 minutes per consultation if people have straight-forward tonsillitis or gastroenteritis.

But what about the parents who are hesitant about vaccinating? I need more than ten minutes to make an impact.

What about the woman whose pregnancy test was unexpectedly positive, and needs to discuss options? She might not have anyone else to discuss options with.

What about the myriad people with psychiatric illness? I need more than ten minutes to figure out if it’s depression, or if there is a history of hypomanic spells. Is it substance induced? Is there another general medical condition? Who can start someone on antidepressants after a ten minute consult? Continue reading “GP Work is Hard”

Tips for New Interns: First Week at Work

Last night I worked my last shift for Community Service. 1 January 2018 will mark three years since I walked into my first day of work. And on that day, more than 1,000 new interns will enter our workforce.

I remember the nerves the night before: being unable to sleep. Feeling like a fraud, like I had been allowed to graduate by accident. Worried that I would be labelled Worst Intern Ever; worried that I’d have awful colleagues. But I survived the first week, and eventually the first year, too.

And so will our new interns. I have some tips for those who need ’em.

64062aa6fd8336df8d9536c250fadde7 Continue reading “Tips for New Interns: First Week at Work”

Are We Secretly Our Own Worst Enemies?

If you’ve been reading South African news, you’ll know that at least 300 interns and community service doctors stand to be unemployed next year, due to a lack of funded posts at accredited institutions.

Perhaps you read about our inhumane working hours last year.

Perhaps you have read about the overflowing hospitals where patients pile up in the corridors.

These are not new problems, we just hear about them more because doctors and patients have phones with cameras, and social media accounts.

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Continue reading “Are We Secretly Our Own Worst Enemies?”

Can I Be A Depressed Doctor?

Ever since I wrote about how going for therapy was my biggest gift to myself*, I’ve met with a few medical students to talk about the topic of mental health. Many of them were worried about their ability to make it through med school with their illness. Many were worried about the viability of a career in medicine with depression.

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When I was a student, there was a rumour that students with mental illness would be excluded from the course. We were informed by our senior students, and they by theirs, and thus the rumour was propagated. Continue reading “Can I Be A Depressed Doctor?”