Finally had my “magical paeds moment”

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Not the same child, photo with permission.

The little girl had come in hurt and bleeding. No too bad, a small gash that was easily approximated and taped (gosh, I love steri strips).

Next: the Tet tox.

She doesn’t know about it yet. For a moment I consider not telling her at all, but she is old enough to feel betrayed. So she sits on her dad’s lap, and we tell her about the special injection that will prevent her from getting sick. We may have used some imagination and invoked superheroes, too.

I braced myself for the struggle the moment the needle pierced her skin.

Nothing. Nada. She sat chewing her candy while I taped the injection site.

You know all those cute videos of doctors giving kids their shots without them noticing? I finally got mine, and that felt kind of special. Sometimes, you need just one small success to give you a bounce in your step.

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The Best GP Advice I’ve Received: Part 1

 

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(c) Simon Prades

The night before my first shift in general practice, I frantically messaged one of my doctor-heroes on Twitter (@sindivanzyl). I think I was hoping for a cheat sheet, something about hypertension and diabetes, but the one thing she emphasised was, “Please, please, always examine your patients.”

For medical students that would probably sound absurd. Duh, how can one not examine the patient? 

But I learned quickly that, in an environment where there are always more patients to see, it is sometimes easier to make a quick observation from across the desk than to do as we have been taught. Continue reading “The Best GP Advice I’ve Received: Part 1”

Doctor. Counsellor. Freedom Fighter.

She was a healthy young woman who came to see me for a “complete check-up” before a holiday overseas. Although I tend to think “complete” check-ups are somewhat overkill, they do present a good opportunity for health promotion and disease prevention. As one does, I asked about sexual history and family planning. She hesitated just a split second before answering, “Well, my only partner is a woman, so I don’t have to worry about pregnancy scares.” And then, we moved on.  Continue reading “Doctor. Counsellor. Freedom Fighter.”

General Practice is not exciting, but it is fulfilling

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By Lauren Squires, with permission. Click image for her Instagram.

As I enter into my third month of General Practitioner work, I find myself reflecting. I started with private GP locums to fill the gap til I got the job I wanted. But now I’m signing a contract and I’m here to stay – for at least another five months.

One evening, my housemate asked, “So, did anything interesting happen at work today?” When I responded in the negative, we laughed about how my work had become almost mundane compared to working in hospital and coming home with fascinating stories of grotesque injuries and life-saving surgeries practically every day. Continue reading “General Practice is not exciting, but it is fulfilling”

GP Work is Hard

One week of some GP locums and I am exhausted.

7b609ee5184afeee3a442d25e5549028I can spend 10 minutes per consultation if people have straight-forward tonsillitis or gastroenteritis.

But what about the parents who are hesitant about vaccinating? I need more than ten minutes to make an impact.

What about the woman whose pregnancy test was unexpectedly positive, and needs to discuss options? She might not have anyone else to discuss options with.

What about the myriad people with psychiatric illness? I need more than ten minutes to figure out if it’s depression, or if there is a history of hypomanic spells. Is it substance induced? Is there another general medical condition? Who can start someone on antidepressants after a ten minute consult? Continue reading “GP Work is Hard”

The Nicest Interns: Part 2

I just recently finished a four-month Family Medicine rotation. Our after-hours duties on Family  Medicine are as casualty officers at the Accident and Emergency Departments of two different hospitals. Because A&E has high-intensity decision making, our shifts were not allowed to be longer than twelve hours (compare: 24 hour shifts in any other department).

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Continue reading “The Nicest Interns: Part 2”

On Poverty and Health: The Obesity-Conundrum

rich man poor man slimmer man fatEver since I started running (and enjoying it), I have been intrigued by the sociology and economics of health and fitness. It coincided with my “coming of age” in medicine, so to speak, so it has been in interesting and ongoing thought-experiment.

I want to address some pertinent falsehoods about health and fitness, and why the disenfranchised have such a hard time of it. Right now I intend to write a two-part series, but who knows.

Quick disclaimer: I would never suggest that being a student-on-a-budget is comparable in hardship to living in poverty. All the same, being a student on a partial scholarship and a heavy student loan certainly did teach me a little about struggling financially and its effects on health. Continue reading “On Poverty and Health: The Obesity-Conundrum”

Something Only Family Physicians Experience

I had such a lovely experience last week. I was working Accident and Emergency overnight, as I have finally completed my surgical posting and moved on to Family Medicine.

A mother brought her nine-month old baby in with a chronic cough. Now, it was probably the happiest baby I had seen all night and probably could have just waited to go to the clinic the next day, but whatever: she was there, so I saw her.

In among the questions of TB, smoking relatives, and pets, I asked if Baby was born term, and how. Her response, “Yes, he was a big baby! You did my Caesarian Section!”

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Continue reading “Something Only Family Physicians Experience”