This one time, at badEMfest18…

Remember that time I went to a little town (village??) called Greyton, with some friends, and had a blast?

It happened again.

This time, not as a student, but as a doctor. Then, Greyton enriched me. This time, it may well have changed my life. Or at least, my career. (Are they really two different things?)

badem-rd

Continue reading “This one time, at badEMfest18…”

Top Ten Diverse Books

This is going to be my favourite Top Ten Tuesday! Right in line with the We Need Diverse Books campaign, here is a list of my favourite books that celebrate diversity (example: features minority/religious minority, socioeconomic diversity, disabled MC,  neurotypical character, LGBTQ etc etc.).

It’s kind of sad how few books are truly diverse. When I was going through my books, I noticed that although a lot of books had diverse characters, many of them were fairly flat and seemed to be little more than tokens. I mean, it’s kind of like movies having the token female scientist and then thinking they’re sorted for diversity. Uhm, no. Not that this is at all a groundbreaking realisation, so moving on to the books: Continue reading “Top Ten Diverse Books”

Book Review: Gracefully Grayson

Grayson is a sensitive kid, orphaned as a baby and living with his aunt, uncle and their two children. Grayson is an artist. He loves thrift stores. He experiences his world vividly. He has undiscovered talents. He is kind.

But he is not who he is. Grayson is not a little boy, even though he was born one and is known as one.

I adored Gracefully Grayson by Ami Polonsky (you should check out her blog). This book is so gently told that one’s love for Grayson just swells. I want to give her a hug and make everything better.

A few weeks ago, Stacey Ann Chin tweeted this:

Well, it’s not a movie, but Disney-Hyperion did well with this book. It is middle-grade and a quick and easy read. The dialogue is genuine and the characters are tangible. Just a group of regular people, navigating their way through some challenges, one that happens to be the issue of transgender children. Continue reading “Book Review: Gracefully Grayson”

A New Generation of LGBT YA

April is LGBT-month with LauraPlusBooks and FightingDreamer. Although I am studying VERY HARD (I really am), I wanted to get this post in really quickly. I realised a while ago that I haven’t read that many LGBT books. I’ve read quite a few where a secondary character is LGBT (The Mortal Instruments, Mara Dyer, etc) and quite a few short-story collections, like Yes, I am! and OMG QUEER. Then there was Every Day (which is kind of, I don’t know, pansexual?) and Luna.

Recently I read Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. It was incredible (not quite a five-star read, due to some issues I have with the final bit of the book) and while reading I kept thinking how this narrative felt to me like a revolution not only in LGBT writing, but YA in general.

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Healthcare for LGBT Patients in South Africa

In our third year, a friend of mine had an upsetting first shift in Trauma Surgery: the first suturing she ever did was on a young woman who had just survived corrective rape. Rape is common in our country in general, and so is the “corrective” rape of gender non-conforming women.

A year later, we saw a transwoman being place in a single room, because the hospital had no policy for what to do with her. She did not want to be in a male ward, but strong leadership was lacking and so a patient with no infectious risk was placed in a single room. It did not sit well with us, but we were fourth years. We did not know what we could do.

Tonight I attended a fantastic talk by Dr Alexandra Muller from the University of Cape Town on providing healthcare for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender patients: why we should care and what we can do better.

health lgbt collage Continue reading “Healthcare for LGBT Patients in South Africa”

Book Review: OMG QUEER

Hope. Fear. Desire. Despair. Promises. Betrayals.

Lesbian. Gay. Bisexual. Transgender. Questioning. Intersex.

This anthology of short stories gives voice to the rising generation as they define what it means to grow up queer in the twenty-first century. What is it like to grow up in a society that embraces you in certain ways but discriminates against you in others? How do you choose a label from the alphabet soup, and should you even have to? By turns heartwarming and heartbreaking, comical and caustic, these stories, imagined and told by youth across America, provide a snapshot of queerness at the dawn of the new millennium.

I had big hopes for this book. The blurb promises a tangible look into the lives of modern young LGBTQI individuals.

Continue reading “Book Review: OMG QUEER”