Top Ten #Booknerd Characters

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Top Ten Tuesdays are on a roll these days, with topics I adore. In line with the diversity theme, what’s the best moment in reading? Discovering a character you can relate to. For me, this is often when I find a character that loves books/words/geekiness just like I do.

These are my favourite fictional bookworms, in order of when I first met them (because I just can’t rank them!).

1. Jo MarchLittle Women by Louisa May Alcott (free on iTunes!)

I don’t think I ever finished reading the full-length version, but I did read the abridged version as a little girl and definitely identified with Jo. I, too, used to love writing plays that my siblings and cousins had to act out.

2. Hermione GrangerHarry Potter by J.K. Rowling

Does she even need any introduction? Hermione was the first character that showed me that being a bookworm could be admirable, rather than embarrassing.

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A Sequel That Isn’t A Sequel | Another Day

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Two years ago almost to the day, I read David Levithan’s Every Day, with a protagonist who wakes up in a different body every day. I loved it so much that I read large sections to my non-reader boyfriend. Every Day became a frame of reference for me and changed the way I looked at the world around me.

If you have read it, you’ll know that it ends on a MASSIVE cliffhanger. We all want to know what happens to A after he does… the thing! (No spoilers allowed.)

But you should know right off the bat that Another Day won’t tell you what happens to A after Every Day. In fact, Levithan is pretty insistent that Another Day is NOT a sequel, but instead a “companion novel.” The same events occur in this book than in the first; except from Rihannon’s point of view. I can totally see this novel being combined with the first, back to back, and readers will have to decide which to read first (because you can absolutely read them in whichever order). Continue reading

Top Ten Diverse Books

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This is going to be my favourite Top Ten Tuesday! Right in line with the We Need Diverse Books campaign, here is a list of my favourite books that celebrate diversity (example: features minority/religious minority, socioeconomic diversity, disabled MC,  neurotypical character, LGBTQ etc etc.).

It’s kind of sad how few books are truly diverse. When I was going through my books, I noticed that although a lot of books had diverse characters, many of them were fairly flat and seemed to be little more than tokens. I mean, it’s kind of like movies having the token female scientist and then thinking they’re sorted for diversity. Uhm, no. Not that this is at all a groundbreaking realisation, so moving on to the books: Continue reading

Top Ten Reads of 2015 So Far

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Hurrah for a Top Ten Tuesday – and one where I’m not working, to boot. I had no idea what to expect of my reading this year. On the one hand: no more formal studying! On the other hand: real-life doctoring with long calls and boring admin. But it has gone well – in fact, as of 18 June I was done with my 2015 reading goals (namely to read 30 books). Not, you know, like that is going to STOP me or anything.

I’ve read some great books these six months! And… some awful ones too. But we won’t dwell on those. Here are the top 10 I’ve read so far. Continue reading

Top Ten Top-Tens

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Happy fifth birthday to Top Ten Tuesdays! I first did a TTT in November 2010, but TTT debuted in June 2010. In celebration, this week’s TTT is about our ten favourite Top Ten Tuesdays. So, here you go! Each time I will link to my post and also to the link-up on The Broke and the Bookish.

1. Top Ten Bookish Memories | My Post | TTT

I’m very proud of this one because I did it for a freebie on 10 July 2012, and then it was chosen as a topic for 5 February 2013. Also, I got a lot of interaction on this post and it made me happy.

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A Lighter Take on Mental Health | Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella

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If you’re a regular here, you know how much I care about mental health, not just in the medical sense (although I do LOVE psychiatry!) but also in terms of the way it is presented in popular culture. Including books. Books count as popular culture, right?!

I must admit that before Finding Audrey I had never read a book featuring any of the anxiety spectrum disorders (I think…). Weird I guess. But I’ve had a good number of patients with Generalised Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder (with and without agoraphobia) so at least I’m not entirely unschooled.

Sophie Kinsella is kind of a big deal, and this is her first foray into YA. To be honest, I’ve heard of her but I’ve never read her before.  But it could have been anyone who wrote it really, I was still going to request it on NetGalley (thanks, Penguin Random House Children’s UK!). Continue reading

Sea Aliens! Secrets! Coney Island! (Read this Book)

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Every once in a while, NetGalley sends out these emails where the first 500 members get an eARC to READ NOW. I love these, because they are usually from publishers who are notoriously stingy with their review copies, especially to non-US reviewers. So, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, I know I’m not your favourite kind of reviewer, but this South African reviewer is very happy I got the chance to read this. Bring this book to ZA!

Now that that’s done: it’s no cliffhanger that I enjoyed this book. I’ve actually had a spate of poorly-chosen review titles (e.g. this one), so it was really nice to read a review copy that didn’t feel like WORK.

That said, when I first read the blurb (AFTER I already requested this book) I kind of went, “Oh. Shit.” Because the description focuses a whole lot on ROMANCE and if there’s one thing I don’t like, it’s when a good action book is ruined by an overload of romance. Continue reading