The Passion Deception: Beyond What You “Like”

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Last week, I wrote about how the idea of “passion” can overwhelm us into unrealistic future prospects. I actually got some good feedback from readers, which leads me to believe that I am certainly not the only one with this experience.

But if you’re a high school student – or otherwise at the threshold of choosing a career – you might wonder, WHERE DOES THAT LEAVE ME? If you have been told your whole life that you need simply to do what you love (and you’ll “never work a day in your life”, yada yada yada), you might not know HOW else to choose a path forward.

My suggestion? Ye ole’ trusty mindmap.

Many of ours (mine included) may have looked something like this:

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When in reality, it probably should have looked something like this: Continue reading

Less Happy

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It’s hard for me to admit this, but a week has actually passed where I did not enjoy work.

This week I switched over to the other hospital in our complex. I’m technically doing internship at two hospitals, so now that I have completed two months in O&G at the one, it’s time to do two months in O&G at the other. And… it’s not the same. The one is an inner-city hospital, the other is a more rural hospital.

But the differences don’t end there. Continue reading

The Passion Deception: Why Passion Is Not Enough

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I had the pleasure of visiting my old high school recently to talk to some of the Matrics about life, their final year of school and their future plans in general. I spoke at length about what I call the Passion Deception. It sounds like a bit of a downer but to be honest, it’s real talk and the more I think about it, the more it makes sense.

passion deception

I feel like many talented youngsters have a pressing desire to do a job that makes them “tick”, and they are taught (myself included) from a young age that the profession you choose should be one you feel passionate about. I can understand why we tell people that too: talented youngsters can often do anything they want to, so “passion” becomes a good indicator of what to leave and what to dive into. Continue reading

Why I Run

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I run because once upon a time I was told that there were two kinds of people: people with brains and people with brawn and that I was the former and that it precluded me from physical activity of worth. I run because although it was meant to be a good thing – brains – it made me feel restricted, faulty, half-human.

I run because I reject the dichotomy. I run because when I am working long shifts and saving lives and keeping the economy afloat (I like to flatter myself) it is not just my brain, but also my body doing it.

BLD6I2fCMAEOcuR Continue reading

Patience with Patients

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There have been a few times in the last year that I was ashamed of myself.

In this particular case, I was on Vascular Surgery Week. It is one of our toughest weeks of Student Internship. We started the day at 07:00 and never left earlier than 21:00 that whole week. The days were incredibly busy and filled with terrible rotting appendages. In addition, the doctors we worked with were just awful and never really taught us anything. Such hours seem harder when you are a student. So… I was in a pretty bad mood.

A young hand touches and holds an old wrinkled hand Continue reading