Ten Books Every Lifelong Learner Should Read

Linking up with The Broke and The Bookish for Top Ten Tuesday. Today’s topic is “Ten books every (X) Should read.”

fa06114a227c0d6d401a3473ca949b4fI have a million-bajillion lists about books every medical student or health-professional should read; so I decided to pretend I know something and suggest books for, well, almost everyone. On Semester at Sea, we had “Lifelong Learners”. These were slightly older voyagers who had already worked and gained life experience, and who sailed with us and audited classes.

I like the concept of lifelong learning. I love the idea that you are not stuck with learning only about whatever you studied in college/university; I love the idea that you can gain knowledge about almost anything if you are inspired to do so (thank you, Google). I believe I am a life-long learner; and I believe that books are at least partially responsible for that.

The list, in no particular order: Continue reading “Ten Books Every Lifelong Learner Should Read”

Collectibles For Your Trip Around The World

In just a few days, the Fall 2015 class of Semester at Sea will embark on their once-in-a-lifetime journey around the world. They will be the first to sail on the new Campus, the World Odyssey, and I may admit to some jealous-sea. (#sorrynotsorry)

A very clear memory for me about SAS was the weight of cost during all the excitement of seeing the world. It was a monumental effort to go on SAS at all, and I wanted to walk away with something tangible I could remember, but that wouldn’t leave me broke. As people wiser than me often remind me: it’s the experiences you bring home that matter most.

collecting semesteratsea

I went on SAS fully intending to buy a lapel pin at every port. Cheap, small, and so very Rotary International. I did not for a second think that I would have trouble finding them, but I could not find one in Burma/Myanmar OR India OR Ghana. (Some of my fellow SASers did. Lucky bastards.) Continue reading “Collectibles For Your Trip Around The World”

What I See In Your Photos With “Poor African Children”

1. I see someone who was lucky enough to travel to a magnificent continent

And we welcome you. We welcome you to feel in your bones the wealth of our loam soil. Listen to the stories whispered by our winds. Immerse yourself in our skies. We welcome you to open your heart – and your eyes – to see that our narrative is more than one of suffering.

not tourist attraction
Base image by Stephen and Melanie Murdoch, click for their Flickr Photostream.

Continue reading “What I See In Your Photos With “Poor African Children””

Travel Throwback: Walking Aimlessly

It has been well over a year since Semester at Sea Spring 2013 and I find myself thinking about it more and more. It was fantastic, and I can’t wait to travel again.

wandering sas

Because I was on a fairly limited budget, I tended to stay in the cities where we docked and I tried to walk as much as possible. Of course I had plans and short trips, but I often spent some time just walking through the city without much of an agenda. I would like to say that I took really deep HONY-esque pictures, but most of those pictures are in my head, safely. Continue reading “Travel Throwback: Walking Aimlessly”

The Travelbug’s Medicine Bag

This post brought to you by wanderlust, a current severe bout of flu-slash-strep-throat-slash-gastro picked up in the Paeds ward (I washed my hands all the time I swear), and a day of reminiscing over Semester at Sea photos. I would say I packed pretty well for my four-month-long around-the-world voyage (and my previous trips abroad too), but there were some things I wished I had packed – or not packed. Here’s my list of medical stuff to consider.

travel health Continue reading “The Travelbug’s Medicine Bag”

Hell Week is Over. But I’d Rather Talk About SAS.

I survived Hell Week. Not sure what that is? Check this post, right at the end.

I don’t really want to talk about it though. I’m pretty traumatised. Thanks to a huge amount of prayers and support and motivation from my family and friends, I survived it. I honestly did not think I would get past Tuesday.

My worst subjects, Surgery and Orthopaedics, went really well. My best subjects, Ophthalmology and Anaesthetics went REALLY badly. We only get our results in like a century though.

Exactly one year ago today, I disembarked Semester at Sea’s MV Explorer in Barcelona. I can’t believe it’s been a year. I miss falling asleep on the rocking ocean. I miss the countries – all of them. It was a great experience.

Watch this spoken word by Stephen Brown, whom I met in the Illness Narratives course we both took on the ship. I tear up every time I watch this. It is the best representation of that voyage. Transcript below.

Continue reading “Hell Week is Over. But I’d Rather Talk About SAS.”

“Water, Water, Every Where”

BjChAS-IEAAojjE

I live in a water-scarce country on a water-scarce continent. I grew up with a little ditty, “Kinders moenie in die water mors nie, die ou mense wil dit drink” – “Children, don’t mess with water, the old people want to drink it”. Parts of my country has had water restrictions in the years that I have lived.

And yet, I have never really wanted for water. When I open a tap, there it is. Cold and ready to drink, albeit chlorinated. Cape Town has some of the cleanest drinking water in the world. I could run through sprinklers as a child. I could swim in swimming pools.

Continue reading ““Water, Water, Every Where””

How I did Semester at Sea while at Medical School

I have alluded to this before, but medical students rarely do Semester at Sea, and when they do, they are usually there for a short while. For example, the few medical students from the University of Virginia who spend a few weeks on the tropical leg of a Spring voyage; or inter-port students, like the Indian medical student who sailed with us from Myanmar to India.

The reason for this is three-fold: for one, SAS students are mostly undergraduate, and mostly from the USA, where medicine is a postgraduate degree. Secondly, the nature of medicine is such that it is very hard to leave temporarily to another institution – not to mention the difficulty in arranging to “miss” practical rotations. Lastly, I’ve not yet seen any SAS courses that are accepted for medical accreditation.

sas libary Continue reading “How I did Semester at Sea while at Medical School”