Campus Life, Real Medicine

DOC-U-MENTALLY: The Film [Review]

Breaking this unintentional hiatus to tell you (read: shout from the rooftops) that I have watched Doc-u-mentally and

IT.

IS.

AMAZING!

I wrote about the crowdfunder for this documentary last year: a “labour of love” that would follow five young South African doctors during one 30 hour call.*

And they made it. And it was wonderful.

I had the pleasure of watching this film at a screening organised by JUDASA this past week, and I was glued to the screen (projector) from the opening shot. So was the rest of the audience.

The five young doctors that were filmed were really fun to watch. The diversity had the potentialto feel a little bit forced, but the producers made it clear from the beginning that it would be “five doctors, five cultures”. They were all great in front of the camera, their personalities entertaining, their emotions real.

I am no film-critic, but I thought the videography was fantastic. This was not an amateur film. Every shot is purposeful. I loved the focus on little things – especially the hands of the doctors.**

I enjoyed the balance of seriousness and humour – because, let’s face it, there is a lot of humour in medicine – even if a lot of it is dark humour.

As a junior doctor, this film gave me something to connect with. It made me feel seen. It made me feel connected to other doctors around the country. We know, rationally, that we are not alone, but sometimes it is hard to believe that we are not the only struggling doctor who sometimes questions their sanity.

It made me realise that even if our petitions sometimes fall on unwilling ears, we are not unheard.

I think that for medical students (current and prospective), this film will be a real look into their future. I think for some it may be a wake-up call. But I also think that for some, it will be an inspiration. Some will feel less alone. Some will realise that they are in the right field after all. And some will decide they are definitely in the wrong field, and that’s okay too.

I took two non-medical friends with me to the screening. They seemed to enjoy it too. They said it was intense. Maybe a little bit gory for those sensitive to blood – but nothing too horrible. Maybe a little bit sad. They both said afterwards that even though I had explained to them what being “on call” meant, they hadn’t really understood – but now, they did.

I want every medical student and doctor to see this. Also the older doctors.

I want the non-medical public to see this. Families of doctors. Families of patients. Politicians – or am I asking too much?

My only complaint is that this is not yet available for sale to the public. I want my own copy!

I hope you will watch it. Below I have linked the upcoming screenings I have been able to find:

Tygerberg Campus on 11 September 2017

Wits Medical School 13 September 2017

Wits Medical School 22 September 2017 (not sure if both Wits dates are confirmed)

*For the life of me, cannot find that post now. It shows up in my searches but I can’t seem to access it. Help?!

**Only after drafting this post did I read that Andre Meyer from Meyer Productions won the SAFTA for Best Cinematography for this film in March this year. 

Advertisements
Campus Life, Real Medicine, Studying Medicine

Mental Health Begins With Medical Students

Every few months, the mental health of doctors/medical students makes it to popular media. It seems like these spikes in attention occur, and everyone shouts YOU SHOULD CARE FOR YOUR DOCTORS! and then we write blogs and we tweet and we make youtube videos and eventually we go back to work, and nothing has changed.

I think we are the missing link. And by “we”, I mean qualified doctors. And also, you, the older doctors. Continue reading “Mental Health Begins With Medical Students”

Campus Life, Studying Medicine

FAQ: Will I Get Into Med School?

Ever since I first posted tips for applying to medicine (in South Africa) in 2014, I have received multiple questions from aspirant medical students.

give up hope dont

The hardest to answer (and thus one of the most popular) is DO I STILL STAND A CHANCE? – usually prefaced with the person’s failure to achieve the desired grades for medical admission, or some other stumbling block. Continue reading “FAQ: Will I Get Into Med School?”

Campus Life, Getting to know me, Real Medicine, Studying Medicine

Dear Medical Student: Med School Is Not Worth Your Self-Harm

[TRIGGER WARNING]

A while ago this secret appeared on PostSecret:

7-fromoverseas
“Medical School made me self harm. It better be worth it.”

Continue reading “Dear Medical Student: Med School Is Not Worth Your Self-Harm”

Campus Life, Real Medicine, Studying Medicine

A Song for Medical Students, Interns, and Basically Everyone

By now this is an old song, but I remember last year I thought: this is the song I want to dedicate to my class.

I don’t know if I’ve always followed its advice. Have I grabbed every opportunity to LIVE? Perhaps not. But I’ll keep working on that.

I keep saying this about medicine: it is when we learn and experience that we come to grow through this profession.

If you’re about to start medical school: grab every opportunity.

If you’re about to finish medical school: grab every opportunity.

If you’re somewhere in-between: grab every opportunity.

No matter where in your journey you are: make it one helluva ride.

Campus Life, Current Affairs, Getting to know me

Dear Graduates: You Should Be Supporting #FeesMustFall

Dear Graduates of South Africa

Perhaps, like me, you shook your head when you first saw the hashtag #FeesMustFall. You empathised with the expense of tertiary education, but you had lives to save or exams to mark or bridges to build and you thought, “Why do young people in this country want to make everything FALL?”

Continue reading “Dear Graduates: You Should Be Supporting #FeesMustFall”

Campus Life, Getting to know me

Weekly Whine: Small Luxuries

In Afrikaans* there is a saying, “It’s the small foxes that ruin the vineyard,” referring to the tendency of many tiny problems to cause the biggest drama.

tumblr_n3zfevQ79N1qhmhdfo1_1280

Never before have I understood it so clearly as now that I am in the thick of South African public healthcare. We work daily in a hospital that is overcrowded and understaffed, with too many things on the CEO’s plate and too little theatre time for our patients. Continue reading “Weekly Whine: Small Luxuries”