Stitched Up: Stories of Life and Death from a Prison Doctor [Book Review]

Immediately after ComServe, when I was unemployed for – gasp! – a whole week, I considered applying to a job as a prison GP. (I did not, because a locum opportunity came along that morphed into something semi-permanent, and other opportunities fell by the wayside for a while.) “Offender healthcare occupies the grey zone betweenContinue reading “Stitched Up: Stories of Life and Death from a Prison Doctor [Book Review]”

Beyond Pride Month: Five Proud Books

This post is inspired by The Secret Life of Albert Entwistle by Matt Cain, a delightful book I had the opportunity to read and review recently.  Pride month is over, the stores have taken down their rainbow banners, and companies have reverted from their ROYGBIV-inspired logos. But that doesn’t mean PRIDE is over, or thatContinue reading “Beyond Pride Month: Five Proud Books”

A lot of queer stuff, basically

Hullo long-time readers, and new faces. I can hardly keep up with the wildness of our world’s current affairs (and my feelings about them). So, I’m taking a leaf out of Sam’s book** and sharing snippets that, well, I feel like sharing. We got married!  We are now officially “Wifeys for Lifey”. My wife (surreal!)Continue reading “A lot of queer stuff, basically”

Mini-Reviews: Medical Non-Fiction

I like to read medical non-fiction. Not textbooks, but the kind of book a layperson with an interest can read, and someone in a medical profession may also enjoy, and learn from. There are three important things I look for in these books: Contributes to the non-medical reader’s understanding/interest of their health and/or bodies inContinue reading “Mini-Reviews: Medical Non-Fiction”

The Future of This Blog

Someone once commented on this blog’s heading*. “Reader, traveler, politics, medical student…” they mused, “Are you sure you’re in the right field of study?” For a second, I thought they were joking. But they weren’t. I had spent enough time wrestling with my career choice. Suggesting that it was a poor one did not dissuadeContinue reading “The Future of This Blog”

That One Patient [Book Review]

I told myself I would remember her forever – the first patient I lost. I was just a third year medical student, and really, it was my team doing the looking after, not me. I’ve forgotten her name by now, but I still remember her.  I initially resisted reading Ellen de Visser’s That One PatientContinue reading “That One Patient [Book Review]”

A Fullness of Uncertain Significance [Book Review]

If a medical doctor pens a memoir, I will read it. I don’t care if they are a surgeon (uneasy relationship), a physician (intimidatingly book smart), or an anaesthetist (well that’s pretty close to home). Even if nobody else reads your book, I will be your audience of one. But A Fullness of Uncertain SignificanceContinue reading “A Fullness of Uncertain Significance [Book Review]”

Prescription Comedy: An Unlikely Antidote to Physician Burnout

Pranathi Kondapaneni, MD, author of Prescription Comedy: An Unlikely Antidote To Physician Burnout, studied medicine some time before me, but our stories are not so different. Although on an entirely different continent, and an entirely different cultural background, her experience with burnout resonates clearly with me. While her writing somewhat lacks prosaism (and has anContinue reading “Prescription Comedy: An Unlikely Antidote to Physician Burnout”

[Book Review] Every Minute Is A Day by Robert Meyer and Dan Koeppel

Not all COVID-books are for doctors. Like many healthcare workers, I have often turned to narratives to cope with my work, and these have been plentiful during the (COVID) pandemic. But eventually one reaches a point where you can no longer look into the mirror of your daily life – and I have reached thatContinue reading “[Book Review] Every Minute Is A Day by Robert Meyer and Dan Koeppel”

Why You Should Read “Manage Your Money Like A F*cking Grownup”

There are two books I regularly see younger doctors carrying around, sneaking a chapter during a coffee break or between theatre cases. The first is When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi, which I reviewed here. The second is (delightfully titled) Manage Your Money Like a F*cking Grownup by Sam Beckbessinger.  Manage Your Money firstContinue reading “Why You Should Read “Manage Your Money Like A F*cking Grownup””